• jmetz35

5 LGBTQ Latinx Heroes for Every Classroom

GLSEN’s National Student Council were asked about the LGBTQ Latinx people who they think should be in every LGBT-inclusive curriculum. Below are the students’ own words about these heroes, who are deeply connected to their communities and who have worked within movements to make change.



“Jennicet Gutierez is the transgender activist who interrupted President Obama at a White House event for LGBT Pride Month this year to demand an end to the deportation of LGBTQ immigrants. She has been a huge inspiration for me. She and the rest of Familia: TQLM are incredible activists, and I truly look up to them.” –Emme

“A bisexual Mexican artist, Frida Kahlo is literally me, but way more of a badass. She has inspired me to love myself as a hairy brown Mexican and bisexual woman. Her art pushes me to keep trying with my own, and the way she broke traditional gender roles has me feel more comfortable with the way that I am. Keeps me going every day.” –Ellie

“Singer and songwriter Juan Gabriel, who recently passed away, was unapologetically flamboyant and Mexican. He had so much pride in his culture and never gave in to the macho-man ideals of traditional Mexican society. He got called some of the nastiest names ever during his lifetime because of the way that he chose to express himself. But he was passionate about the music that he made. He never stopped performing. He made me comfortable with myself and inspired me to exist as loudly as possible. He had a heart of gold, and honestly he will never stop being my hero for that.” –Ellie

“Julio Salgado is so so so so so so incredible. He has transformed a highly marginalized intersectional identity into a platform for empathy and activism. He is queer and undocumented, and as a filmmaker, he uses his art to shine light on important issues related to undocumented LGBTQ life. His works enable people to realize they are not alone while also influencing political and cultural thought.” –Matt


“Denice Frohman is a queer spoken-word artist. She writes about her struggles as a queer minority and is a part of many LGBTQ Latinx organizations. She won Women of the World Slam Poetry in 2013, the same year she won Creative Artist of the Year at the Hispanic Choice Awards.” –Miguel


2 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Being Latinx & LGBTQ: An Introduction

According to the Pew Research Center, Latinxs made up 17.4 percent of the total U.S. population in 2014. Data analysis by the Williams Institute reveals there are approximately 1.4 million LGBT Latinx

Cancer Facts & Figures for Hispanics and Latinos

According to estimates from the US Census Bureau, 57.5 million Americans, or 18% of the population in the continental US and Hawaii, identified themselves as Hispanic or Latino in 2016. In addition, m